How do the best CPAP machines help you to get better sleep?

sleep apnea is your body’s failure to breathe properly during sleep.  This is most commonly caused by the soft tissue at the back of your nose, mouth, and throat collapsing and blocking your airways (known as Obstructive Sleep Apnea, or OSA).  It can also be caused by poor communication between your lungs and brain so the command to breathe isn’t always sent and received (this is Central Sleep Apnea, CSA).

Cpap machine You may not even know you have sleep apnea and therefore you may not know you need one of the best CPAP machines available to you. Your only clue that something isn’t right might be tiredness during the day despite getting 8 hours of sleep at night. It may well take your loving, and by now very irritable, partner to tell you that in the night you regularly stop breathing and then start again with a loud snort.  Or your body has periods of panicked behavior throughout the night as it rushes to level out oxygen levels in your blood again after you’ve unknowingly not taken a breath for the best part of two minutes.  Sleep apnea is diagnosed by a sleep study, and if confirmed it is a condition that you should not ignore.

buy cpap machine How will the best CPAP machines help you?  Imagine this; you’re trying to put on a rubber glove but it’s stuck together, what do you do?  Blow into it to it, inflate it and open it up.  Now imagine that glove is your respiratory system during the night and a small machine on your bedside table is providing a stream of air to keep your pipes open whilst you sleep. That is the basic function of the CPAP machine – it provides a Continous Positive Airway Pressure so you achieve unbroken peaceful sleep without choking and spluttering as your own throat blocks itself in your sleep.

If you have Central Sleep Apnea, you’ll still need to look at the best CPAP machines but a variation known as a BiPAP machine.  Rather than continuously blowing that rubber glove open, here there are two rates of air flow (one for inhaling, one for exhaling) that maintain the body’s breathing rhythm when the messages between the lungs and brain have abandoned their duties.